Fly Right! Have a plan.

As many of you know, I entered the commercial UAV/UAS world (better known as drones) several months ago.

The unfortunate thing is, the only media coverage that really is predominant are those incidents that shine some negative light on what can be and is a valuable tool in a variety of disciplines.

This recent incident in West Kelowna B.C., just screams of a UAV pilot that doesn’t appreciate the responsibility, the accountability and the general safety and Inspire 1 site photowell being of anyone. Scratch pilot from that previous statement and just add operator. Any reputable UAV pilot knows the restrictions, respects the regulations and in fact is mostly likely a proponent for change. Such as I am. This is an aircraft plain and simple.

So how could this particular situation been different? A UAV/UAS could have been used for pre-evacuation surveillance at the leading edge of the restricted airspace. It could have assisted the various other emergency services on the ground in pre-planning or execution. This task or function could be facilitated either from a commercial entity or that within one of the attending services.

The skies can be friendly, there is room for a UAV/UAS industry to work in conjunction with the already existing commercial flight world and in the assistance of emergency services.

Those individuals conducting stunts like the one highlighted in this article and others I’m sure you can Google, obviously do not adhere to the training, research and for that matter the pre-flight rigor that I put myself through and many others in the industry do as well.

Prior flight day equipment checks, site research, flight plan research, day of flight equipment inspections, site assessment (often including a physical walk about), neighboring property (where applicable) communication, on site communication and training, NOTAMs where needed or required, closest areodrome contact and so on. A long flight, a short flight…safety is always first.

Is there a lot of work that can go into a pre-flight process? Yes. Could all that work be done and no flight takes place? Absolutely. Weather & safety considerations are probably the biggest two obstacles. And of course, pilot mindset. All worth it in the end.

As with all the services I provide, and the advise I give; Plan the Work. Work the Plan.

In the neighborhood for a UAV/UAS Pilot? Do your homework and make sure they have a plan.

 

 

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Services takes off

Michael White CPP CRM has expanded his services to include UAV’s.

UAVs provide an ideal platform for a range of security, risk mitigation, emergency disaster response and surveillance applications. Services can be modified to your specific requirments.

All equipment is fitted with high definition video cameras with still photography capability, plus thermal infrared imaging systems are available for various applications and situations.

Services and features include:

  • Real-time observation – a stable bird’s eye view with the ability to zoom in, take photos and manoeuvre the payload like a 3D pan-tilt-zoom security camera “on demand” with HD video or thermal infrared capability.
  • Covert and overt surveillance of critical infrastructure and perimeters to provide protection to staff, resources and assets.
  • Suspicious object/package assessment (visually).
  • Rapid response to remotely identified security threats.
  • Ongoing and routine surveillance according to a pre-determined flight path.
  • Aerial archival videography & photography
  • Industrial, Commercial & Real Estate aerial inspection

Contact Michael White CPP CRM to understand how UAV Services can assist you identify and mitigate risk.

Michael White CPP CRM has successfully participated and completed a Transport Canada recognized UAV Ground School and has successfully received his Restricted Operators Certificate – Aeronautical qualification.

Pay Attention

Pay Attention

So I’m fortunate enough to get to do some traveling with my work and get to see many an interesting place, work with incredibly passionate and hard working individuals for several large organizations and institutions.

I’m also asked about the small organizations or even just some residential services.  So I put some thought into it and I’ve put together some services for the small business/entrepreneur type organizations but nothing really for the residential side of things.  Until I went for a drive locally.  This rant will be as long as the drive was.  I still don’t don’t have any services for the residential side of things but I definitely have some advice.

So many homeowners install security/intrusion alarms.  We get them for only a handful of reasons;

  1. Recent break-in to our home
  2. Recent birth of a child
  3. Recent break-in to our neighbor’s home
  4. Recent purchase(s) of valuable items (eg; jewellery, electronics, antiques)
  5. Recent death in a relative that resided with us

There are other personal reasons but you get the idea.  Many reasons revolve around one of the above themes.

So you’ve listened to the sale person’s pitch, you liked it, you buy it, you have it installed it works.  Warning labels go on the windows, maybe a lawn sign out front, the hole nine yards.  So you go about your business keeping your property clean and in order, ensuring the labels are visible to act as the deterrent to any unwanted activity.

Question.  Has your alarm installation company or your alarm monitoring company done the same?  I couldn’t believe my eyes when I drove pass a local alarm installation/monitoring company’s office only to see that they had no warning labels in the window and that there business sign out front had been tagged with graffiti.  Are you kidding me?  The alarm company wasn’t even paying attention to what was happening on their own property.  How are they able to in good conscience give you advice on how you are to maintain yours to deter unwanted activity?

Here’s the advice.  Before you buy, visit their office.  See what security devices, tools or aids they are using on their property.  Ask if it all works.  Request a demonstration of the equipment if possible.  Is it the shoe cobbler story?  Everyone’s shoes are better than theirs.  These aren’t shoes we’re talking about, these are security and life safety devices we’re talking about.  If it’s important to you it should be extremely important to the company selling it to you.

I can also appreciate that there is a small portion of the market that is often referred to as the “one-truck, one-installer’ organization.  Nothing wrong with them, know several.  Their truck is their rolling office.  Does it look maintained?  Quickly peering into it, do you see client information just thrown about inside the cab of the truck?

If they’re not willing to maintain their security, how well or attentive are they going to be to yours.

Wow, haven’t ranted like that in a while.  Thanks for listening.

Plan the Work. Work the Plan.

 

The eyes have it.

In the shadow of 9/11, in the wake of the Arab Spring, rioting in the UK and various other global events either classified as terrorism, freedom uprising or just misguided youth, one industry that has been constant and growing is video cameras.

Whether its been surveillance or sousveillance we capture billions of images and stream days upon days worth of video daily.  Here are the distinctions between the two;

Surveillance (in the context of this article) :observation from a distance by means of electronic equipment (such as CCTV cameras); it is the monitoring of the behavior, activities, or other changing information, usually of people and often in a surreptitious manner.

Sousveillance (in the context of this article): typically involves community-based recording from first person perspectives, without necessarily involving any specific political agenda, whereas inverse-surveillance is a form of sousveillance that is typically directed at, or used to collect data to analyze or study, surveillance or its proponents (e.g., the actions of police at a protest rally).

So where is it all lead?  Interesting article on the Post 9/11 surveillance.